How Edgewood Hall's Historic Facade Was Back to Life

When we bought Edgewood Hall, the outside of the house was cracked, peeling, and overgrown. But we knew just how to whip it into shape.

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Trevor Dixon
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Before shot of Edgewood Hall
Courtesy of Eddie Ross

When we bought Edgewood Hall, the outside of the house was cracked, peeling, and overgrown. But we knew just how to whip it into shape.

1. Gut the gutters.

We had Marlboro Sheet Metal make us copper gutters, just like the original house would have had.


2. Do double-duty.

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Trevor Dixon

Shutters from the Philadelphia Shutter Company look authentic—and actually close for privacy.


3. Mix old and new.

We found a 1920s front door at a salvage shop, and we replaced the windows with vintage-inspired new ones by Ply Gem.


4. Step up the stairs.

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Trevor Dixon

The cement was refaced with pretty reclaimed brick.


5. Add a trellis.

Custom-built by Fritz Carpentry, the trellises can be taken down—vines and all—for house painting.


6. Plant smart.

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Trevor Dixon

Roots Landscape curated a mix of easy-care perennials (hollyhocks, delphiniums) for an English-garden feel.


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7. Paint a fresh coat.

The shutter color (Fine Paints of Europe’s Opaline Green) was inspired by verdigris copper, and a front door in Sherwin-Williams’s Sockeye is a fun take on Federal red. Alabaster, also by Sherwin- Williams, is a no-fail white.


8. Preserve the details.

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Trevor Dixon

The house’s original letter slot had been painted over, so we had it sandblasted and reinstalled.


9. Mark your turf.

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Trevor Dixon

Copper plant markers from Terrain help us remember what’s where when the plants get mulched over.


10. Roses Headline.

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Trevor Dixon

Climbing roses will grow up the trellis over time.



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